Harvard University

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Harvard University

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Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1636 as Harvard College and named for its first benefactor, Puritan clergyman John Harvard, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. Its influence, wealth, and rankings have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Harvard's founding was authorized by the Massachusetts colonial legislature, "dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches". Though never formally affiliated with any denomination, in its early years Harvard College primarily trained Congregational clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century. By the 19th century, Harvard emerged as the most prominent academic and cultural institution among the Boston elite. Following the American Civil War, under President Charles William Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909), the college developed multiple affiliated professional schools that transformed the college into a modern research university. In 1900, Harvard co-founded the Association of American Universities. James B. Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II, and liberalized admissions after the war. The university is composed of ten academic faculties and the Harvard Radcliffe Institute. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences offers study in a wide range of undergraduate and graduate academic disciplines, and other faculties offer only graduate degrees, including professional degrees. Harvard has three main campuses: the 209-acre (85 ha) Cambridge campus centered on Harvard Yard; an adjoining campus immediately across Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston; and the medical campus in Boston's Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is valued at $50.7 billion, making it the wealthiest academic institution in the world. Endowment income enables the undergraduate college to admit students regardless of financial need and provide financial aid with no loans. According to the American Library Association, Harvard University has the fourth-largest library by volumes held in the United States. Harvard alumni, faculty, and researchers have included 188 living billionaires, 8 U.S. presidents, numerous heads of state, founders of notable companies, Nobel laureates, Fields Medalists, members of Congress, MacArthur Fellows, Rhodes Scholars, Marshall Scholars, Turing Award Recipients, Pulitzer Prize winners, and Fulbright Scholars; by most metrics, Harvard ranks among the top globally in each of these categories. Additionally, students and alumni have won 10 Academy Awards and 110 Olympic medals (46 gold).

Article Title : Harvard University
Article Snippet :Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1636 as Harvard College and named for its first
Article Title : Harvard University Press
Article Snippet :Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing
Article Title : President of Harvard University
Article Snippet :The president of Harvard University is the chief administrator of Harvard University and the ex officio president of the Harvard Corporation. Each is
Article Title : List of Harvard University people
Article Snippet :The list of Harvard University alumni includes notable graduates, professors, and administrators affiliated with Harvard University. For a list of notable
Article Title : Harvard University endowment
Article Snippet :The Harvard University endowment, valued at $49.444 billion as of June 30, 2022[update], is the largest academic endowment in the world. Its value increased
Article Title : Harvard Business School
Article Snippet :Harvard Business School (HBS) is the graduate business school of Harvard University, a private research university in Boston, Massachusetts. It owns Harvard
Article Title : Harvard Library
Article Snippet :Harvard Library is the network of Harvard University's libraries and services. It is the oldest library system in the United States and both the largest
Article Title : Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard
Article Snippet :Admissions (SFFA) filed suit against Harvard University in U.S. District Court in Boston, alleging that the university's undergraduate admission practices
Article Title : Harvard Extension School
Article Snippet :Harvard Extension School (HES) is the Continuing Education School of Harvard University, a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Article Title : History of Harvard University
Article Snippet :The history of Harvard University begins in 1636, when Harvard College was founded in the young settlement of New Towne in Massachusetts, which had been

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636. Its history, influence and wealth have made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregationalist and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any academic institution in the world, standing at $36.4 billion.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the University's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. It operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums, alongside the Harvard Library, which is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries with over 18 million volumes. Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, several foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, and 335 Rhodes Scholars. To date, some 150 Nobel laureates and 5 Fields Medalists (when awarded) have been affiliated as students, faculty, or staff.


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Princeton University

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey, United States. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton was the fourth chartered institution of higher education in the Thirteen Colonies and thus one of the nine Colonial Colleges established before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, where it was renamed Princeton University in 1896.

Princeton provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and engineering. It offers professional degrees through the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Architecture and the Bendheim Center for Finance. The University has ties with the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton Theological Seminary, and the Westminster Choir College of Rider University. Princeton has the largest endowment per student in the United States.

The University has graduated many notable alumni. It has been associated with 41 Nobel laureates, 17 National Medal of Science winners, the most Abel Prize winners and Fields Medalists of any university (four and eight, respectively), ten Turing Award laureates, five National Humanities Medal recipients and 204 Rhodes Scholars. Two U.S. Presidents, 12 U.S. Supreme Court Justices (three of whom currently serve on the court), and numerous living billionaires and foreign heads of state are all counted among Princeton's alumni. Princeton has also graduated many prominent members of the U.S. Congress and the U.S. Cabinet, including eight Secretaries of State, three Secretaries of Defense, and two of the past four Chairs of the Federal Reserve.

Academic home to more than 2,700 graduate students, 5,300 undergraduates, and 1,100 faculty members, Princeton University offers a unique combination of resources in a community that provides wide-ranging cultural and intellectual opportunities. We encourage you to peruse our offerings and meet with our faculty to discover which field of study is best suited for your interests. By doing so, you will get a feel of what it is like to reside in our community of scholars, collaborate with our distinguished faculty and work in our state-of-the-art facilities. Scholars from all disciplines, backgrounds and interests are encouraged to apply.
The University prepares graduate students for distinguished careers in research, teaching, and as experts in the public and private sectors. Master’s students are trained to assess information and trends in their fields and to create original works. Doctoral students perform research at the highest level, advancing knowledge in their fields.
Princeton’s commitment to supporting students’ scholarly activity is demonstrated in numerous ways, including generous funding in which Princeton guarantees full tuition, fees, and a stipend for its regularly enrolled, degree-seeking Ph.D. candidates for all years of regular program enrollment, contingent upon satisfactory academic performance.


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3D Universities rankings

RankUniversities3D Score
#1Harvard University98.0
#2Stanford University97.0
#3McGill University95.7
#4Cambridge University94.7
#5Massachussetts Institute of Technology93.5
#6Oxford University92.8
#7UC Berkeley91.9
#8Princeton University90.6
#9Columbia University89.8
#10University of Chicago88.7